Some blog articles from Wineman with all our latest thoughts on vintages, wines and what to serve with food

Australian Shiraz

If You Want A Wine To Go With Kangaroo (Or Barbeques) Choose An Australian Shiraz

A wine to conquer other wines in the Shiraz popularity contests. This wine originates from Rhone in France, where it traditionally has a black pepper flavour, the Australian Shiraz produces a dark chocolate note. Region, like country, are important to the flavour of this wine and it has become one of Australias great assets.

Made from the grape variety Syrah, which is a dark skinned fruit, it was first planted in Australia towards the end of the eighteenth century. It produces rich, hearty red wines with an intense berry fruit flavour.

Vastly varying climates of Australia allow winemakers to produce both the chocolatey flavour the country is known for and the black pepper varieties of it’s French ancestry. The reason for this variance is climate and temperature. Where the air is cooler the Aussie Syrah has a distinct black pepper flavour, often fresher, of mid-weight and dry.

But the warmer Aussie climates are home to the countries oldest vines. Steep inclines and shallow soil provide perfect growing conditions for concentrated flavourful grapes, the higher up the slope the better. And once harvested they’re soaked before pressing, to reduce the tannin and herb like flavours and increase fruitiness and colour.

Central Victoria and the Hunter Valley regions produce a peppery flavoured robust wine, which with ageing can obtain a leathery or earthy note. In contrast a minty noted variety is produced in Clare and Coonawarra and could be ideal with lamb dishes.

Should you be considering a Syrah for your wine collection the Australian Shiraz offers highly collectable varieties from the Wendaree, Henschke, and Penfold estates (with price tags to match). A wine with such variety and noticeable traits can lend itself to easy recognition of origin making it a superb choice for collectors.

The light crisp wine and the dark bold wine have many food combination possibilities. And should you have difficulty getting hold of kangaroo all is not lost. You could drink this fabulous wine with gamey meats, especially if it’s a fuller flavoured aged variety. Beef and other red meats with unsweetened sauces also work particularly well.

A lighter, younger Shiraz will compliment the grilled meats of the barbeque, and even richer grilled fish such as Salmon, giving the party a touch of class. Vegetarian guests won’t be left out either if you pair this wine with mushrooms and spiced vegetable dishes.

Should you be hosting a more refined dinner, for a select few special friends, the cheese course could be accompanied by an Aussie Shiraz, in place of port. The stronger tastes of cheddar or smelly soft cheeses in particular are a great combination with this red.

Whether you are new to red wine or a connoisseur there’s bound to be a variety of the Australian Syrah, with it’s many flavours and regions, that suits your palate and budget. This fabulous drink will remain a firm favourite for many years.  

With Particular thanks to Catherine Demelza Hewitt for contributing this article http://alittlecurl.com

 


1 Comment


Dom Hodgson said…
Nice article. I've had a few of these, Coonawara being one of my favourites, great to know a bit about the areas, geography and climates that the wines come from too. Nice tip on the shiraz with smelly cheeses, would have to be a good one to make me pass on the Port with cheese though.

Thanks

Dom

Post a Comment


Please sign in or create an account to post a comment
Some blog articles from Wineman with all our latest thoughts on vintages, wines and what to serve with food

Australian Shiraz

If You Want A Wine To Go With Kangaroo (Or Barbeques) Choose An Australian Shiraz

A wine to conquer other wines in the Shiraz popularity contests. This wine originates from Rhone in France, where it traditionally has a black pepper flavour, the Australian Shiraz produces a dark chocolate note. Region, like country, are important to the flavour of this wine and it has become one of Australias great assets.

Made from the grape variety Syrah, which is a dark skinned fruit, it was first planted in Australia towards the end of the eighteenth century. It produces rich, hearty red wines with an intense berry fruit flavour.

Vastly varying climates of Australia allow winemakers to produce both the chocolatey flavour the country is known for and the black pepper varieties of it’s French ancestry. The reason for this variance is climate and temperature. Where the air is cooler the Aussie Syrah has a distinct black pepper flavour, often fresher, of mid-weight and dry.

But the warmer Aussie climates are home to the countries oldest vines. Steep inclines and shallow soil provide perfect growing conditions for concentrated flavourful grapes, the higher up the slope the better. And once harvested they’re soaked before pressing, to reduce the tannin and herb like flavours and increase fruitiness and colour.

Central Victoria and the Hunter Valley regions produce a peppery flavoured robust wine, which with ageing can obtain a leathery or earthy note. In contrast a minty noted variety is produced in Clare and Coonawarra and could be ideal with lamb dishes.

Should you be considering a Syrah for your wine collection the Australian Shiraz offers highly collectable varieties from the Wendaree, Henschke, and Penfold estates (with price tags to match). A wine with such variety and noticeable traits can lend itself to easy recognition of origin making it a superb choice for collectors.

The light crisp wine and the dark bold wine have many food combination possibilities. And should you have difficulty getting hold of kangaroo all is not lost. You could drink this fabulous wine with gamey meats, especially if it’s a fuller flavoured aged variety. Beef and other red meats with unsweetened sauces also work particularly well.

A lighter, younger Shiraz will compliment the grilled meats of the barbeque, and even richer grilled fish such as Salmon, giving the party a touch of class. Vegetarian guests won’t be left out either if you pair this wine with mushrooms and spiced vegetable dishes.

Should you be hosting a more refined dinner, for a select few special friends, the cheese course could be accompanied by an Aussie Shiraz, in place of port. The stronger tastes of cheddar or smelly soft cheeses in particular are a great combination with this red.

Whether you are new to red wine or a connoisseur there’s bound to be a variety of the Australian Syrah, with it’s many flavours and regions, that suits your palate and budget. This fabulous drink will remain a firm favourite for many years.  

With Particular thanks to Catherine Demelza Hewitt for contributing this article http://alittlecurl.com

 


1 Comment


Dom Hodgson said…
Nice article. I've had a few of these, Coonawara being one of my favourites, great to know a bit about the areas, geography and climates that the wines come from too. Nice tip on the shiraz with smelly cheeses, would have to be a good one to make me pass on the Port with cheese though.

Thanks

Dom

Post a Comment


Please sign in or create an account to post a comment