Montepulciano

A selection of wines made using the Montepulciano grape variety.

Valle Reale make really good Montepulciano.

This grape is planted extensively throughout Southern and Central Italy epecially in areas like Umbria, Marche and Abruzzo. It should not be confused with the Vino Nobile de Montepulciano which is a wine made with thr Sangiovese grape and named aftyer the town of Montepulciano.

This is Italy's second most planted grape variety and it is one that is often misprounced in the UK. This stops many people from ordering it from a wine list for fear of being made to look a little silly at their lack of skill in pronunciation. It is a grape that ripens late and it produces deep coloured wines with medium acidity. This means it is a very versatile wine to serve on it's own or with food.

There are generally two styles of Montepulciano, those made to keep and the ones made for immediate consumption or within one year of bottling. This fact is reflected in the price as the wine can be cheap and cheerful or expensive depending on the skill of the winemakers and the winery it comes from.  

The most cultivated grape variety in Central Italy is Sangiovese. The second most cultivated one is Montepulciano, for the same historical reasons: strength and huge yields that, in the dark era when humanity strove for quantity instead of quality, could always guarantee an abundant production of wine.

Vineyards of montepulciano are scattered all over Central Italy (climate in Northern Italy is still too rigid for this grape, that ripens slowly and needs warmth and sun to mature completely and give pleasant, round wines): from Emilia-Romagna to Lazio, and even in a few southern regions, like Molise and Apulia, Italian winemakers cultivate montepulciano both to produce wines mainly made from this variety and to use small percentages of it in blends and make them more complex and structured. 

Yet, there are no vineyards of montepulciano variety by the hamlet of Montepulciano in Tuscany. Conversely to what many people think (in Italy, too), the famous and refined Vino nobile di Montepulciano is not made of montepulciano grapes, but entirely of sangiovese, and takes its name from the village it comes from, and not from the plant.

Montepulciano grapes, instead, are the raw material of many other quality wines, such as Torgiano from Umbria, Offida and Rosso Conero from Marche, and, obviously, Montepulciano d’Abruzzo (from the region with the same name).

Besides the strength of this variety and the ease by which it can be cultivated, another reason of such for a popularity among Italian winemakers throughout the history is the quality of the wine that can be obtained by this grape.

When fully ripened, these grapes give a mouthfilling, pretty complex red wine that has scents of cherry, plum and pansy, and that can easily be paired to the hearty cuisine of Central Italy, which is not made of fish and vegetables only, but also of wild game, pasta dishes with rich dressings, tasty aged cheeses and cured meat specialities.

There are no products to show

Montepulciano

A selection of wines made using the Montepulciano grape variety.

Valle Reale make really good Montepulciano.

This grape is planted extensively throughout Southern and Central Italy epecially in areas like Umbria, Marche and Abruzzo. It should not be confused with the Vino Nobile de Montepulciano which is a wine made with thr Sangiovese grape and named aftyer the town of Montepulciano.

This is Italy's second most planted grape variety and it is one that is often misprounced in the UK. This stops many people from ordering it from a wine list for fear of being made to look a little silly at their lack of skill in pronunciation. It is a grape that ripens late and it produces deep coloured wines with medium acidity. This means it is a very versatile wine to serve on it's own or with food.

There are generally two styles of Montepulciano, those made to keep and the ones made for immediate consumption or within one year of bottling. This fact is reflected in the price as the wine can be cheap and cheerful or expensive depending on the skill of the winemakers and the winery it comes from.  

The most cultivated grape variety in Central Italy is Sangiovese. The second most cultivated one is Montepulciano, for the same historical reasons: strength and huge yields that, in the dark era when humanity strove for quantity instead of quality, could always guarantee an abundant production of wine.

Vineyards of montepulciano are scattered all over Central Italy (climate in Northern Italy is still too rigid for this grape, that ripens slowly and needs warmth and sun to mature completely and give pleasant, round wines): from Emilia-Romagna to Lazio, and even in a few southern regions, like Molise and Apulia, Italian winemakers cultivate montepulciano both to produce wines mainly made from this variety and to use small percentages of it in blends and make them more complex and structured. 

Yet, there are no vineyards of montepulciano variety by the hamlet of Montepulciano in Tuscany. Conversely to what many people think (in Italy, too), the famous and refined Vino nobile di Montepulciano is not made of montepulciano grapes, but entirely of sangiovese, and takes its name from the village it comes from, and not from the plant.

Montepulciano grapes, instead, are the raw material of many other quality wines, such as Torgiano from Umbria, Offida and Rosso Conero from Marche, and, obviously, Montepulciano d’Abruzzo (from the region with the same name).

Besides the strength of this variety and the ease by which it can be cultivated, another reason of such for a popularity among Italian winemakers throughout the history is the quality of the wine that can be obtained by this grape.

When fully ripened, these grapes give a mouthfilling, pretty complex red wine that has scents of cherry, plum and pansy, and that can easily be paired to the hearty cuisine of Central Italy, which is not made of fish and vegetables only, but also of wild game, pasta dishes with rich dressings, tasty aged cheeses and cured meat specialities.

There are no products to show