Prosecco

Prosecco Sparkling Wines

Prosecco sparkling wines from Italy are hugely popular at the moment and with great reason. Prosecco normally comes as Dry, Extra Dry and Brut in style but the extra Dry is actually sweeter! Prosecco was the grape variety originally and this was renamed as Glera to avoid confusion. Prosecco is now the biggest sensation in the wine world and it's sales are soon to outstrip supply. 

This sparkling wine is made in the north of Italy specifically in the Veneto region. It's worldwide success is due to the fact that it is less dry and acidic compared to Champagne and other sparkling wines.

 

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Prosecco is an Italian sparkling wine that has become extremely popular in recent times.

In 2014 it sold more than Champagne in UK and it’s still the most exported Italian sparkling wine, thanks to its “drinkability” and low price.

The DOCG production area is a limited zone situated in Conegliano and its surroundings, while the DOC area stretches into four other provinces in region Veneto and into two in region Friuli-Venezia Giulia.

This largeness is due to the increasing demand of Prosecco, which is re-designing the vineyards in North-Eastern Italy: winemakers are planting more and more Glera vines, often removing the ones of other varieties to make room.

Glera, indeed, is the soul of Prosecco.

Being produced by Charmat method, the primary aromas of the grape are not blurred by the sur lie aging that takes place when using classical method, and the wine still keeps the grape’s peculiarities.

Glera has ancient origins. It is believed it was cultivated by Romans around the I century by the northern shore of the Adriatic Sea. On the hills in the backcountry of nowadays Trieste lies a small village called Prosecco, reputed to be the place where the Glera variety originated. The grape’s name, indeed, was just Prosecco and had been changed arbitrarily to Glera when they established the DOCG of Prosecco, to avoid confusion between the wine and the grape (and to avoid that any wine made by Glera could be called Prosecco).

One of the synonyms of Glera is “Grappolo Spargolo” (literally meaning “scattered bunch”), because its berries are not too close to one another. Berries are round (sometimes oval) and develope a vivid gold-yellow color once mature.

It is a semiaromatic grape, because of the fruity aromas it conserves even after turned into wine. 

Glera variety is what makes Prosecco smell of white flowers, sometimes of citrus peel and, above all, crunchy, juicy green apple - thus giving it the “drinkability” of above.

Prosecco is an Italian sparkling wine that has become extremely popular in recent times.

In 2014 it sold more than Champagne in UK and it’s still the most exported Italian sparkling wine, thanks to its “drinkability” and low price.

The DOCG production area is a limited zone situated in Conegliano and its surroundings, while the DOC area stretches into four other provinces in region Veneto and into two in region Friuli-Venezia Giulia.

This largeness is due to the increasing demand of Prosecco, which is re-designing the vineyards in North-Eastern Italy: winemakers are planting more and more Glera vines, often removing the ones of other varieties to make room.

Glera which is the grape that Prosecco is made from is indeed the soul of this Italian Sparkling wine.

Being produced by Charmat method, the primary aromas of the grape are not blurred by the sur lie aging that takes place when using the classical method, and the wine still keeps the grape’s peculiarities.

Glera has ancient origins. It is believed it was cultivated by Romans around the I century by the northern shore of the Adriatic Sea. On the hills in the backcountry of nowadays Trieste lies a small village called Prosecco, reputed to be the place where the Glera variety originated. The grape’s name originally was just Prosecco and had been changed arbitrarily to Glera when they established the DOCG of Prosecco, to avoid confusion between the wine and the grape (and to avoid that any wine made by Glera could be called Prosecco).

One of the synonyms of Glera is “Grappolo Spargolo” (literally meaning “scattered bunch”), because its berries are not too close to one another. Berries are round (sometimes oval) and develope a vivid gold-yellow color once mature.

It is a semiaromatic grape, because of the fruity aromas it conserves even after turned into wine. 

Glera variety is what makes Prosecco smell of white flowers, sometimes of citrus peel and, above all, crunchy, juicy green apple - thus giving it the “drinkability” of above.

Prosecco is made in different styles but the most popular are Extra Dry and Brut with Brut, ironically being the drier style .

Prosecco

Prosecco Sparkling Wines

Prosecco sparkling wines from Italy are hugely popular at the moment and with great reason. Prosecco normally comes as Dry, Extra Dry and Brut in style but the extra Dry is actually sweeter! Prosecco was the grape variety originally and this was renamed as Glera to avoid confusion. Prosecco is now the biggest sensation in the wine world and it's sales are soon to outstrip supply. 

This sparkling wine is made in the north of Italy specifically in the Veneto region. It's worldwide success is due to the fact that it is less dry and acidic compared to Champagne and other sparkling wines.

 

Sort by:
Showing 1 to 8 of 8
view: per page
Sort by:
Showing 1 to 8 of 8
view: per page

Prosecco is an Italian sparkling wine that has become extremely popular in recent times.

In 2014 it sold more than Champagne in UK and it’s still the most exported Italian sparkling wine, thanks to its “drinkability” and low price.

The DOCG production area is a limited zone situated in Conegliano and its surroundings, while the DOC area stretches into four other provinces in region Veneto and into two in region Friuli-Venezia Giulia.

This largeness is due to the increasing demand of Prosecco, which is re-designing the vineyards in North-Eastern Italy: winemakers are planting more and more Glera vines, often removing the ones of other varieties to make room.

Glera, indeed, is the soul of Prosecco.

Being produced by Charmat method, the primary aromas of the grape are not blurred by the sur lie aging that takes place when using classical method, and the wine still keeps the grape’s peculiarities.

Glera has ancient origins. It is believed it was cultivated by Romans around the I century by the northern shore of the Adriatic Sea. On the hills in the backcountry of nowadays Trieste lies a small village called Prosecco, reputed to be the place where the Glera variety originated. The grape’s name, indeed, was just Prosecco and had been changed arbitrarily to Glera when they established the DOCG of Prosecco, to avoid confusion between the wine and the grape (and to avoid that any wine made by Glera could be called Prosecco).

One of the synonyms of Glera is “Grappolo Spargolo” (literally meaning “scattered bunch”), because its berries are not too close to one another. Berries are round (sometimes oval) and develope a vivid gold-yellow color once mature.

It is a semiaromatic grape, because of the fruity aromas it conserves even after turned into wine. 

Glera variety is what makes Prosecco smell of white flowers, sometimes of citrus peel and, above all, crunchy, juicy green apple - thus giving it the “drinkability” of above.

Prosecco is an Italian sparkling wine that has become extremely popular in recent times.

In 2014 it sold more than Champagne in UK and it’s still the most exported Italian sparkling wine, thanks to its “drinkability” and low price.

The DOCG production area is a limited zone situated in Conegliano and its surroundings, while the DOC area stretches into four other provinces in region Veneto and into two in region Friuli-Venezia Giulia.

This largeness is due to the increasing demand of Prosecco, which is re-designing the vineyards in North-Eastern Italy: winemakers are planting more and more Glera vines, often removing the ones of other varieties to make room.

Glera which is the grape that Prosecco is made from is indeed the soul of this Italian Sparkling wine.

Being produced by Charmat method, the primary aromas of the grape are not blurred by the sur lie aging that takes place when using the classical method, and the wine still keeps the grape’s peculiarities.

Glera has ancient origins. It is believed it was cultivated by Romans around the I century by the northern shore of the Adriatic Sea. On the hills in the backcountry of nowadays Trieste lies a small village called Prosecco, reputed to be the place where the Glera variety originated. The grape’s name originally was just Prosecco and had been changed arbitrarily to Glera when they established the DOCG of Prosecco, to avoid confusion between the wine and the grape (and to avoid that any wine made by Glera could be called Prosecco).

One of the synonyms of Glera is “Grappolo Spargolo” (literally meaning “scattered bunch”), because its berries are not too close to one another. Berries are round (sometimes oval) and develope a vivid gold-yellow color once mature.

It is a semiaromatic grape, because of the fruity aromas it conserves even after turned into wine. 

Glera variety is what makes Prosecco smell of white flowers, sometimes of citrus peel and, above all, crunchy, juicy green apple - thus giving it the “drinkability” of above.

Prosecco is made in different styles but the most popular are Extra Dry and Brut with Brut, ironically being the drier style .