Spanish Wines

WINES FROM SPAIN

A selection of wines from Spain from a variety of important regions such as Rioja and Ribera del Duero. 

Spanish is wine like none other in the world. It presents such a tremendous value for the incredible quality and history it embodies. Their indigenous Tempranillo (also called Tinto Fino and Tinto del Pais) grape ranks alongside Bordeaux's Cabernet Sauvignon, Tuscany's Sangiovese, and Germany's Riesling as one of the classic expressions in the world of wine. They make scintillating Grenache as well and many other fascinating red Spanish born varietals. Spain is not solely defined by their red wines either, they make a whole host of interesting and high quality white wines and are responsible for the legendary wines  from Jerez called Sherry. The current quest for wine gems at a reasonable price point needs to look no further than Spain, for they have somehow decided to produce wines of spectacular provenance and character and keep them available to the common wine drinker. Below is a run down of the majors regions and some of the fantastic wines that each region puts out. 

RIOJA

We must of course mention Spain's most celebrated wine region and it's most celebrated wineries. Rioja is home to some of the most impressive and storied bodegas in all of Spain. They specialize in wines made from Tempranillo that are often aged for quite some time in barrel and in bottle before release depending on their category. There are four distinct categories of wine in Rioja that have rules that encompass each, these are Rioja (formally Vin Joven) , Crianza, Reserva, and Gran Reserva. The basic "Rioja" distinction are usually simple wines that don't require much aging and are meant to be consumed within the first couple years after their release. These are easy drinking wines will lower tannin levels made from usually younger vineyards. "Crianza" is considered a step up in quality  and requires a minimum of one year in cask and a few months in bottle before release. Reserva are wines selected from the best vintages that must be aged for a minimum of three years total and at least one of those years in barrel. The wines carrying the distinction of Gran Reserva are wine made in only exceptional vintages and require a minimum of at least two years in cask and an additional three years bottle age before release. Some of the best and most famous producers are Viña El Pisón, Bodegas Muga, Bodegas Roda, R. Lopez de Heredia, Bodegas Cune, Bodegas Ondarre, Marques de Riscal, Bodegas Martionez Laorden, Marques de Murrieta, Cotino, Contador, and several others. 

Ribera Del Duero

This is a younger region that's only been a recognized DO since 1982. This doesn't mean that their wines aren't up to snuff though, in fact they are some of Spain's most sought after reds and can be the most expensive as well. Like Rioja, the wines are generally based on the red grape Tempranillo. Grenache and Cabernet Sauvignon are also used, but not quite so often. In contrast to the wines of Rioja, these reds tend to be a bit bolder and powerful. They are typically made in a more modern style and are often aged in small French oak barriques instead of the traditional American oak barrels that many Rioja producers still use to this day. Some of the best producers include Bodegas Vega Sicilia, Dominio de Pingus, Pesquera, Condado de Haza, Emilio Moro and Bodegas Linaje Garsea makes especially good Ribera.. 

Priorat

These are some of the most incredibly distinct wines that really show Grenache with a rare and unique typicity. Of course everything done in Catalonia is a bit unique and impressive. The region has become somewhat of a cult producer with wines that score outrageous marks from the critics, and demand top dollar on the market. What's great though is that there are also good examples of Priorat that are very affordable. The wines of Priorat are dark and inky and must contain a minimum alcohol percentage of 13.5% by Spanish laws for the DO. Carignan or Carinena is a secondary grape used in the region, but is somewhat rustic in nature and doesn't normally dominate the blend. 

Rias Baixas

This region in Galicia is home of some of the best and most distinguishable white wine on the earth. Albariño is by far Spain's most outstanding white variety and has incredible complexity for a white grape normally fermented in stainless steal vats. The grape is actually indigenous to the sub-zone in Rias Baixas called Val do Salnés. Albariño wines embody an exciting salinity and minerality gained from the regions' close proximity to the ocean. The wine has a great high, but balanced acidity and a full weight and mouthfeel somewhat similar to Viognier. The aromatic complexity of these wines is also quite stunning and really has it's own character that is incomparable to other wines of the world. Serra de Estrella Albarino is one of our favourites at Wineman.

Penedes 

Home of Spain's magnificent sparkling wines made in the traditional Champagne method (secondary ferment in bottle). The traditional grapes used to make CAVA are Xarello, Macabeu, and Parellada. Chardonnay is also sometime used and is permitted under the DO. 95% of all the Cava produced in Spain comes from the area of Penedes located in Catalonia. Cava is a touch less yeasty and rich than Champagne normally is and has a somewhat different flavor profile. The wines are also much more affordable than the majority of French made sparking wines. One of the fantastic contributions to the world of sparkling wine that was innovated in Spain was the invention of the gyropallete, which is a large mechanized and rotating device that replaced the need for hand riddling. 

Jerez

Talking about the great wine regions of Spain without mentioning Jerez would be a crime because Sherry is one of the most unique and under appreciated wines in the world. Made primarily from the Palomino grape, Sherry are intentionally oxidized white wines that carry an amazing amount of complexity and a flavor profile all of their own. There are several distinct and unique styles of Sherry ranging from light and dry, to darker, richer, heavier, and sweet. Without getting too into the intricacies of fermentation techniques and the use of the "solera" a system of progressing barrel fermentation, let's just simply say that Sherry is one of the best and most under rated wine and food paring matches. It goes extremely well with green olives, all sorts of spanish cured meats, and cheeses native to the region. 

Sort by:
Showing 1 to 20 of 47
view: per page
Sort by:
Showing 1 to 20 of 47
view: per page

WINES FROM SPAIN

Spanish is wine like none other in the world. It presents such a tremendous value for the incredible quality and history it embodies. Their indigenous Tempranillo (also called Tinto Fino and Tinto del Pais) grape ranks alongside Bordeaux's Cabernet Sauvignon, Tuscany's Sangiovese, and Germany's Riesling as one of the classic expressions in the world of wine. They make scintillating Grenache as well and many other fascinating red Spanish born varietals. Spain is not solely defined by their red wines either, they make a whole host of interesting and high quality white wines and are responsible for the legendary wines  from Jerez called Sherry. The current quest for wine gems at a reasonable price point needs to look no further than Spain, for they have somehow decided to produce wines of spectacular provenance and character and keep them available to the common wine drinker. Below is a run down of the majors regions and some of the fantastic wines that each region puts out. 

RIOJA

We must of course mention Spain's most celebrated wine region and it's most celebrated wineries. Rioja is home to some of the most impressive and storied bodegas in all of Spain. They specialize in wines made from Tempranillo that are often aged for quite some time in barrel and in bottle before release depending on their category. There are four distinct categories of wine in Rioja that have rules that encompass each, these are Rioja (formally Vin Joven) , Crianza, Reserva, and Gran Reserva. The basic "Rioja" distinction are usually simple wines that don't require much aging and are meant to be consumed within the first couple years after their release. These are easy drinking wines will lower tannin levels made from usually younger vineyards. "Crianza" is considered a step up in quality  and requires a minimum of one year in cask and a few months in bottle before release. Reserva are wines selected from the best vintages that must be aged for a minimum of three years total and at least one of those years in barrel. The wines carrying the distinction of Gran Reserva are wine made in only exceptional vintages and require a minimum of at least two years in cask and an additional three years bottle age before release. Some of the best and most famous producers are Viña El Pisón, Bodegas Muga, Bodegas Roda, R. Lopez de Heredia, Bodegas Cune, Bodegas Ondarre, Marques de Riscal, Bodegas Martionez Laorden, Marques de Murrieta, Cotino, Contador, and several others. 

Ribera Del Duero

This is a younger region that's only been a recognized DO since 1982. This doesn't mean that their wines aren't up to snuff though, in fact they are some of Spain's most sought after reds and can be the most expensive as well. Like Rioja, the wines are generally based on the red grape Tempranillo. Grenache and Cabernet Sauvignon are also used, but not quite so often. In contrast to the wines of Rioja, these reds tend to be a bit bolder and powerful. They are typically made in a more modern style and are often aged in small French oak barriques instead of the traditional American oak barrels that many Rioja producers still use to this day. Some of the best producers include Bodegas Vega Sicilia, Dominio de Pingus, Pesquera, Condado de Haza, Emilio Moro and Bodegas Linaje Garsea makes especially good Ribera.. 

Priorat

These are some of the most incredibly distinct wines that really show Grenache with a rare and unique typicity. Of course everything done in Catalonia is a bit unique and impressive. The region has become somewhat of a cult producer with wines that score outrageous marks from the critics, and demand top dollar on the market. What's great though is that there are also good examples of Priorat that are very affordable. The wines of Priorat are dark and inky and must contain a minimum alcohol percentage of 13.5% by Spanish laws for the DO. Carignan or Carinena is a secondary grape used in the region, but is somewhat rustic in nature and doesn't normally dominate the blend. 

Rias Baixas

This region in Galicia is home of some of the best and most distinguishable white wine on the earth. Albariño is by far Spain's most outstanding white variety and has incredible complexity for a white grape normally fermented in stainless steal vats. The grape is actually indigenous to the sub-zone in Rias Baixas called Val do Salnés. Albariño wines embody an exciting salinity and minerality gained from the regions' close proximity to the ocean. The wine has a great high, but balanced acidity and a full weight and mouthfeel somewhat similar to Viognier. The aromatic complexity of these wines is also quite stunning and really has it's own character that is incomparable to other wines of the world. Serra de Estrella Albarino is one of our favourites at Wineman.

Penedes 

Home of Spain's magnificent sparkling wines made in the traditional Champagne method (secondary ferment in bottle). The traditional grapes used to make CAVA are Xarello, Macabeu, and Parellada. Chardonnay is also sometime used and is permitted under the DO. 95% of all the Cava produced in Spain comes from the area of Penedes located in Catalonia. Cava is a touch less yeasty and rich than Champagne normally is and has a somewhat different flavor profile. The wines are also much more affordable than the majority of French made sparking wines. One of the fantastic contributions to the world of sparkling wine that was innovated in Spain was the invention of the gyropallete, which is a large mechanized and rotating device that replaced the need for hand riddling. 

Jerez

Talking about the great wine regions of Spain without mentioning Jerez would be a crime because Sherry is one of the most unique and under appreciated wines in the world. Made primarily from the Palomino grape, Sherry are intentionally oxidized white wines that carry an amazing amount of complexity and a flavor profile all of their own. There are several distinct and unique styles of Sherry ranging from light and dry, to darker, richer, heavier, and sweet. Without getting too into the intricacies of fermentation techniques and the use of the "solera" a system of progressing barrel fermentation, let's just simply say that Sherry is one of the best and most under rated wine and food paring matches. It goes extremely well with green olives, all sorts of spanish cured meats, and cheeses native to the region. 

Spanish Wines

WINES FROM SPAIN

A selection of wines from Spain from a variety of important regions such as Rioja and Ribera del Duero. 

Spanish is wine like none other in the world. It presents such a tremendous value for the incredible quality and history it embodies. Their indigenous Tempranillo (also called Tinto Fino and Tinto del Pais) grape ranks alongside Bordeaux's Cabernet Sauvignon, Tuscany's Sangiovese, and Germany's Riesling as one of the classic expressions in the world of wine. They make scintillating Grenache as well and many other fascinating red Spanish born varietals. Spain is not solely defined by their red wines either, they make a whole host of interesting and high quality white wines and are responsible for the legendary wines  from Jerez called Sherry. The current quest for wine gems at a reasonable price point needs to look no further than Spain, for they have somehow decided to produce wines of spectacular provenance and character and keep them available to the common wine drinker. Below is a run down of the majors regions and some of the fantastic wines that each region puts out. 

RIOJA

We must of course mention Spain's most celebrated wine region and it's most celebrated wineries. Rioja is home to some of the most impressive and storied bodegas in all of Spain. They specialize in wines made from Tempranillo that are often aged for quite some time in barrel and in bottle before release depending on their category. There are four distinct categories of wine in Rioja that have rules that encompass each, these are Rioja (formally Vin Joven) , Crianza, Reserva, and Gran Reserva. The basic "Rioja" distinction are usually simple wines that don't require much aging and are meant to be consumed within the first couple years after their release. These are easy drinking wines will lower tannin levels made from usually younger vineyards. "Crianza" is considered a step up in quality  and requires a minimum of one year in cask and a few months in bottle before release. Reserva are wines selected from the best vintages that must be aged for a minimum of three years total and at least one of those years in barrel. The wines carrying the distinction of Gran Reserva are wine made in only exceptional vintages and require a minimum of at least two years in cask and an additional three years bottle age before release. Some of the best and most famous producers are Viña El Pisón, Bodegas Muga, Bodegas Roda, R. Lopez de Heredia, Bodegas Cune, Bodegas Ondarre, Marques de Riscal, Bodegas Martionez Laorden, Marques de Murrieta, Cotino, Contador, and several others. 

Ribera Del Duero

This is a younger region that's only been a recognized DO since 1982. This doesn't mean that their wines aren't up to snuff though, in fact they are some of Spain's most sought after reds and can be the most expensive as well. Like Rioja, the wines are generally based on the red grape Tempranillo. Grenache and Cabernet Sauvignon are also used, but not quite so often. In contrast to the wines of Rioja, these reds tend to be a bit bolder and powerful. They are typically made in a more modern style and are often aged in small French oak barriques instead of the traditional American oak barrels that many Rioja producers still use to this day. Some of the best producers include Bodegas Vega Sicilia, Dominio de Pingus, Pesquera, Condado de Haza, Emilio Moro and Bodegas Linaje Garsea makes especially good Ribera.. 

Priorat

These are some of the most incredibly distinct wines that really show Grenache with a rare and unique typicity. Of course everything done in Catalonia is a bit unique and impressive. The region has become somewhat of a cult producer with wines that score outrageous marks from the critics, and demand top dollar on the market. What's great though is that there are also good examples of Priorat that are very affordable. The wines of Priorat are dark and inky and must contain a minimum alcohol percentage of 13.5% by Spanish laws for the DO. Carignan or Carinena is a secondary grape used in the region, but is somewhat rustic in nature and doesn't normally dominate the blend. 

Rias Baixas

This region in Galicia is home of some of the best and most distinguishable white wine on the earth. Albariño is by far Spain's most outstanding white variety and has incredible complexity for a white grape normally fermented in stainless steal vats. The grape is actually indigenous to the sub-zone in Rias Baixas called Val do Salnés. Albariño wines embody an exciting salinity and minerality gained from the regions' close proximity to the ocean. The wine has a great high, but balanced acidity and a full weight and mouthfeel somewhat similar to Viognier. The aromatic complexity of these wines is also quite stunning and really has it's own character that is incomparable to other wines of the world. Serra de Estrella Albarino is one of our favourites at Wineman.

Penedes 

Home of Spain's magnificent sparkling wines made in the traditional Champagne method (secondary ferment in bottle). The traditional grapes used to make CAVA are Xarello, Macabeu, and Parellada. Chardonnay is also sometime used and is permitted under the DO. 95% of all the Cava produced in Spain comes from the area of Penedes located in Catalonia. Cava is a touch less yeasty and rich than Champagne normally is and has a somewhat different flavor profile. The wines are also much more affordable than the majority of French made sparking wines. One of the fantastic contributions to the world of sparkling wine that was innovated in Spain was the invention of the gyropallete, which is a large mechanized and rotating device that replaced the need for hand riddling. 

Jerez

Talking about the great wine regions of Spain without mentioning Jerez would be a crime because Sherry is one of the most unique and under appreciated wines in the world. Made primarily from the Palomino grape, Sherry are intentionally oxidized white wines that carry an amazing amount of complexity and a flavor profile all of their own. There are several distinct and unique styles of Sherry ranging from light and dry, to darker, richer, heavier, and sweet. Without getting too into the intricacies of fermentation techniques and the use of the "solera" a system of progressing barrel fermentation, let's just simply say that Sherry is one of the best and most under rated wine and food paring matches. It goes extremely well with green olives, all sorts of spanish cured meats, and cheeses native to the region. 

Sort by:
Showing 1 to 20 of 47
view: per page
Sort by:
Showing 1 to 20 of 47
view: per page

WINES FROM SPAIN

Spanish is wine like none other in the world. It presents such a tremendous value for the incredible quality and history it embodies. Their indigenous Tempranillo (also called Tinto Fino and Tinto del Pais) grape ranks alongside Bordeaux's Cabernet Sauvignon, Tuscany's Sangiovese, and Germany's Riesling as one of the classic expressions in the world of wine. They make scintillating Grenache as well and many other fascinating red Spanish born varietals. Spain is not solely defined by their red wines either, they make a whole host of interesting and high quality white wines and are responsible for the legendary wines  from Jerez called Sherry. The current quest for wine gems at a reasonable price point needs to look no further than Spain, for they have somehow decided to produce wines of spectacular provenance and character and keep them available to the common wine drinker. Below is a run down of the majors regions and some of the fantastic wines that each region puts out. 

RIOJA

We must of course mention Spain's most celebrated wine region and it's most celebrated wineries. Rioja is home to some of the most impressive and storied bodegas in all of Spain. They specialize in wines made from Tempranillo that are often aged for quite some time in barrel and in bottle before release depending on their category. There are four distinct categories of wine in Rioja that have rules that encompass each, these are Rioja (formally Vin Joven) , Crianza, Reserva, and Gran Reserva. The basic "Rioja" distinction are usually simple wines that don't require much aging and are meant to be consumed within the first couple years after their release. These are easy drinking wines will lower tannin levels made from usually younger vineyards. "Crianza" is considered a step up in quality  and requires a minimum of one year in cask and a few months in bottle before release. Reserva are wines selected from the best vintages that must be aged for a minimum of three years total and at least one of those years in barrel. The wines carrying the distinction of Gran Reserva are wine made in only exceptional vintages and require a minimum of at least two years in cask and an additional three years bottle age before release. Some of the best and most famous producers are Viña El Pisón, Bodegas Muga, Bodegas Roda, R. Lopez de Heredia, Bodegas Cune, Bodegas Ondarre, Marques de Riscal, Bodegas Martionez Laorden, Marques de Murrieta, Cotino, Contador, and several others. 

Ribera Del Duero

This is a younger region that's only been a recognized DO since 1982. This doesn't mean that their wines aren't up to snuff though, in fact they are some of Spain's most sought after reds and can be the most expensive as well. Like Rioja, the wines are generally based on the red grape Tempranillo. Grenache and Cabernet Sauvignon are also used, but not quite so often. In contrast to the wines of Rioja, these reds tend to be a bit bolder and powerful. They are typically made in a more modern style and are often aged in small French oak barriques instead of the traditional American oak barrels that many Rioja producers still use to this day. Some of the best producers include Bodegas Vega Sicilia, Dominio de Pingus, Pesquera, Condado de Haza, Emilio Moro and Bodegas Linaje Garsea makes especially good Ribera.. 

Priorat

These are some of the most incredibly distinct wines that really show Grenache with a rare and unique typicity. Of course everything done in Catalonia is a bit unique and impressive. The region has become somewhat of a cult producer with wines that score outrageous marks from the critics, and demand top dollar on the market. What's great though is that there are also good examples of Priorat that are very affordable. The wines of Priorat are dark and inky and must contain a minimum alcohol percentage of 13.5% by Spanish laws for the DO. Carignan or Carinena is a secondary grape used in the region, but is somewhat rustic in nature and doesn't normally dominate the blend. 

Rias Baixas

This region in Galicia is home of some of the best and most distinguishable white wine on the earth. Albariño is by far Spain's most outstanding white variety and has incredible complexity for a white grape normally fermented in stainless steal vats. The grape is actually indigenous to the sub-zone in Rias Baixas called Val do Salnés. Albariño wines embody an exciting salinity and minerality gained from the regions' close proximity to the ocean. The wine has a great high, but balanced acidity and a full weight and mouthfeel somewhat similar to Viognier. The aromatic complexity of these wines is also quite stunning and really has it's own character that is incomparable to other wines of the world. Serra de Estrella Albarino is one of our favourites at Wineman.

Penedes 

Home of Spain's magnificent sparkling wines made in the traditional Champagne method (secondary ferment in bottle). The traditional grapes used to make CAVA are Xarello, Macabeu, and Parellada. Chardonnay is also sometime used and is permitted under the DO. 95% of all the Cava produced in Spain comes from the area of Penedes located in Catalonia. Cava is a touch less yeasty and rich than Champagne normally is and has a somewhat different flavor profile. The wines are also much more affordable than the majority of French made sparking wines. One of the fantastic contributions to the world of sparkling wine that was innovated in Spain was the invention of the gyropallete, which is a large mechanized and rotating device that replaced the need for hand riddling. 

Jerez

Talking about the great wine regions of Spain without mentioning Jerez would be a crime because Sherry is one of the most unique and under appreciated wines in the world. Made primarily from the Palomino grape, Sherry are intentionally oxidized white wines that carry an amazing amount of complexity and a flavor profile all of their own. There are several distinct and unique styles of Sherry ranging from light and dry, to darker, richer, heavier, and sweet. Without getting too into the intricacies of fermentation techniques and the use of the "solera" a system of progressing barrel fermentation, let's just simply say that Sherry is one of the best and most under rated wine and food paring matches. It goes extremely well with green olives, all sorts of spanish cured meats, and cheeses native to the region.